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Official List of nationwide holidays for 2016 from http://www.gov.ph

Nineteen nationwide holidays have been declared for 2016, so far.

The following were declared by virtue of Proclamation No. 1105, s. 2015, unless otherwise specified:

January 1, 2016, Friday – New Year’s Day (Regular holiday)

January 2, 2016, Saturday – Additional special non-working day

February 8, 2016, Monday – Chinese New Year (Special non-working day)

February 25, 2016 – EDSA People Power Revolution (Special non-working day by virtue ofProclamation No. 1071, s. 2015)

March 24, 2016 – Maundy Thursday (Regular holiday)

March 25, 2016 – Good Friday (Regular holiday)

March 26, 2016 – Black Saturday (Special non-working day)

April 9, 2016, Saturday – Araw ng Kagitingan (Regular holiday)

May 1, 2016, Sunday – Labor Day (Regular holiday)

May 9, 2016, Monday – The national and local elections (special public non-working holiday by virtue of Proclamation No. 1254, s. 2016)

June 12, 2016, Sunday – Independence Day (Regular holiday)

August 21, 2016, Sunday – Ninoy Aquino Day (Special non-working day)

August 29, 2016, Monday – National Heroes Day (Regular holiday)

October 31, 2016, Monday – Additional special non-working day

November 1, 2016, Tuesday – All Saints Day (Special non-working day)

November 30, 2016, Wednesday – Bonifacio Day (Regular holiday)

December 24, 2016, Saturday – Additional special non-working day

December 25, 2016, Sunday – Christmas Day (Regular holiday)

December 30, 2016, Friday – Rizal Day (Regular holiday)

December 31, 2016, Saturday – Additional special non-working day


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ABC’s for Good Health

In health there is freedom. Health is the first of all liberties. With a longer life expectancy of human beings as compared to pre-modern age, people have been  vigilant to think about and create ways to even extend the lives of everyone. Henri-Frédéric Amiel

health is wealth photo: Health videos and interwiews Healthvideosandinterwiews_zpsf5c3dff4.jpg

Staying healthy requires a lot of thinking and self reflection to be successful. Numerous mnemonics and acronyms have been developed as well by nutritionists and scientists to help people have a guide on how to stay healthy. One of these would be the ABC’s of staying healthy, a very simple, yet effective way of adding to the long list of patterns to keep healthy.

A Is For Abstinence

“A” stands for abstinence. Most probably many would already be thinking that this seems like the same ABC tip for responsible sex. Though the keywords used in the ABC’s of staying healthy are similar except for the last one, the ideas are completely in a different context as this would specifically target more of a person’s lifestyle in everyday living.

Abstinence should be practiced by the person in declining the things that would not make him healthy in the process. Unless it is required such as a career that would limit the choice to either quit the job or to counter the effects with good health practices, abstinence on a great level is required of the person should he wish to start staying healthy and maintain being healthy. Abstinence should be the basis of any individual to serve as a disciplinary concept. Without
the discipline to know when to say no, it would prove difficult to stay away from the things that people have learned to love.

B Is For Be Faithful

“B” stands for “Be Faithful”. Being faithful is being able to hold out and maintain focus on your objective of staying healthy. It does not mean that you totally become a no-nonsense robot who only distinguishes a black from white, but being lenient is a risky thing  to inculcate. Though it is not really to bend the rules from time to time because of valid reasons, it may develop into a nasty habit of having an excuse for every single choice that should have been for staying healthy.

C Is For Calisthenics

Calisthenics or exercise is and has always been part of any healthy program designed for health conscious and health seekers alike. Calisthenics does not necessarily mean the rigorous training that one sees in advertisements and magazines. Those are for bodybuilders who would want to reshape their bodies into hard sculptured specimens of humanity.
Calisthenics are simple activities which would allow one’s self to move about and permit the proper flow of blood to the different parts of the body for optimal oxygenation of the cells.

Calisthenics should be done everyday for at least thirty to forty-five minutes which includes mainly aerobic exercise. Not only does daily calisthenics improve the cardiovascular flow of the body, it also adds up to the amount of calories to be burned for the day to maintain the desired body weight and fitness level.


Quote:

A healthy attitude is contagious but don’t wait to catch it from others. Be a carrier.- Tom Stoppard

Words to live by:

The ABC’s of staying healthy is a very elementary concept for anyone to grasp should they wish to seek a better health state or maintain an already good one.  The extent of its success lies on the amount of effort that the individual puts in each letter of this simple mnemonic. It is a personal choice as it is a personal endeavor.


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Achieving Results through Strategic Performance Management System (SPMS) EO No. 80 s, 212

Pursuant to Executive Order (EO) No. 80, s.2012 (Directing the Adoption of a Performance-Based Incentive System for Government Employees) and Memorandum Circular (MC) 2012-01 (Guidelines on the Cascading of Department Performance Targets in line with EO. No. 80) issued by the Administrative Order (AO) 25 Inter-Agency Task Force (IATF), a Performance Based Incentive System (PBIS) consisting of the Productivity Enhancement Incentive (PEI) and the Performance-Based Bonus (PBB) shall be adopted in the National Government beginning Fiscal Year (FY) 2012

The PBB shall be characterized by a system of ranking Delivery Units and personnel within a Department/Agency according to their contribution to their respective Department/Agency performance. Such performance shall be measured by verifiable and sustainable indicators based on their Major Final Outputs (MFOs), commitments to the President supportive of the priorities under EO 43, s. 2011; and good governance conditions specified in various Memorandum Circular Issued by the IATF through the use of the Strategic Performance Management System (SPMS).

Every task/job is accountable for adhering and performing to some level of standards or compliance. Standards of operating excellence may include a a compliance standard, specific quality standard, a legal standard, or some other metric of best practices. ‘Timely and accurate’ is a perfectly
acceptable operating standard against which many outcomes need to be performed. Everyone should have a clear understanding of the operational standards within which they’re paid to achieve business results. Thus, Individual indicator, Division/Office level success indicators must contribute and align with the Agency level success indicators. Success indicators should be SMART – Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time-bound. Taken together the above can be used to accomplish the Major Final Output (MFO) listed in the Office Performance Commitment Review (OPCR). From the President to the Janitor, every position is accountable for achieving certain and specific business outcomes and results. Yet, too often successful performance is viewed or defined as having accomplished tasks, not as having achieved outcomes, reflect on these instances:

  • Answering phone calls is a task. Making sure every customer at the other end of the phone has a fantastic service experience is an outcome.
  • Implementing a new marketing strategy is a task. Gaining a 20% increase in market share as a result of an excellence executed marketing strategy is an outcome.
  • Swinging a bat and hitting the ball is a task. Scoring home runs is an outcome.

TEAM APPROACH TO PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
SPMS GUIDELINES PROVIDE FOR CASCADING OF ORGANIZATIONAL UNIT’S COMMITMENTS/GOALS TO INDIVIDUAL STAFF MEMBERS SUCH THAT INDIVIDUAL WORK PLANS OR COMMITMENT AND RATING FORMS ARE LINKED TO OFFICE/DIVISION/UNIT WORK PLAN OR COMMITMENT AND RATING FORM

Advantages of Performance Management
For Managers
Clarify definitions of job/success criteria
Increase motivation to perform
Increase self-esteem
Enhance self-insight and development

Advantages of Performance Management
For Managers
Communicate supervisors’ views of performance more clearly
Managers gain insight about subordinates
Better and more timely differentiation between good and poor performers
Employees become more competent

Advantages of Performance Management
For Organizations

Clarify organizational goals
Facilitate organizational change
Fairer, more appropriate administrative actions
Better protection from lawsuits

For more info on effective implementation of SPMS email me at jaimemenorjr@yahoo.com


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What to do when your job title doesn’t match your job responsibilities

I asked all of our recruiters to give me all resumes of prospective employees with their name, gender, place of origin, and age blacked out. This simple change shocked me, because I found myself interviewing different-looking candidates – even though I was 100% convinced that I was not being biased in my resume selection process. Eric Ries

A friend of mine asked for my help recently in composing her resume. She works as an Office Manager for a small business. In her role, she assumes all responsibilities of an Office Manager. In addition, she partners with the company owner to set policies, works with freelancers on marketing materials, serves as a liaison between vendors and shipping service companies, and conducts calls for sales leads that are collected at trade shows. In other words, her title doesn’t encompass all of her job responsibilities. Several potential employers have in fact had concerns about the difference in her title and her overall position in the company, wondering if she had exaggerated her responsibilities on her resume.

 

Many professionals run into situations where the title they have at their current job is so specific to the company that it carries no meaning outside of the organization, or it implies that they are a level or more below their actual work responsibilities. The difficulty we face in these situations is accurately accounting for our professional experience on our resume in order to advance in our careers. There is no easy way to address this as you want to remain truthful on your resume; you wouldn’t want your potential employer calling for a reference check and getting an impression you lied about your work history, do you?

 

There is a debate among professionals about listing job titles versus job functions on your resume. Some people prefer listing their title as it is, followed by a list of responsibilities, while others strongly prefer finding a way to rephrase your title to encompass your job function(s). The best option, however, is to find a happy medium and list your job title along with a few words that describe your job function, before you begin listing your job responsibilities.

 

First, let’s explore making changes to the job titles as you include them on your resume. If your title unusual, or very specific to the organization, you should try to find an equivalent title that is well accepted and understood within your industry. For example, if you work as a customer support representative supporting a specific product and your title contains the product name, you can simply list Product Support Representative on your resume. However, be careful not to exaggerate your title. Do not change your title so that it implies change in responsibility or salary level; do not change the area of the organization where you work, or change your title in a way that suggest you are directly reporting to a person in a higher position than that of your manager. Any such changes on your resume are dishonest, and will negatively impact your credibility with your potential employer.

 

If your title implies less responsibility than you hold, chose the middle ground option described above. List your actual title on your resume. For example, if you are a Product Support Representative but are also responsible for training new hires for your team, list your title as follows: Product Support Representative/Customer Support and New Hire Training. All you are doing here is elaborating on your job title by including a brief description of your job function. Following this title, make sure that your resume includes power statements describing your actual job responsibilities, in order of their importance and relevance to your career title. This method is preferred because you are honest about your title, but you are also indicating to your employer that your responsibilities are slightly different than what the title implicates. When background checks and reference calls are conducted, you will not have to worry about misrepresenting your title, or causing raised questions about your credibility. Above all, your resume must be honest. Do the best you can to remain objective when it comes to your job titles and functions – focus on the positives, and you are sure to have a winning resume.


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What will you do with the gaps in your work experience

I asked all of our recruiters to give me all resumes of prospective employees with their name, gender, place of origin, and age blacked out. This simple change shocked me, because I found myself interviewing different-looking candidates – even though I was 100% convinced that I was not being biased in my resume selection process. Eric Ries

What to do with gaps in your work experience?

Listing your professional experiences on your resume is a difficult task. There are so many elements to consider: job titles, time frames, key responsibilities, transferable skills, etc. The process becomes even more difficult if you have gaps in your work history. Your potential employer will not have a way of knowing why there is a three and a half year gap in your professional experience just by reviewing your resume, for example. The employer may wonder if you skipped over one of the jobs you held because it doesn’t meet your career objective, or they may assume that you didn’t work at all during the time frame that is unaccounted for on your resume. Any gaps in your employment history will need to be explained in writing; thus, don’t skip any information on purpose.

There are a few general rules about resume gaps:

–              Any unaccounted time that is shorter than three months doesn’t need to be explained. Having 60-90 days in between jobs is not too unusual, and often goes unnoticed within a resume. However, any gaps extending beyond three months should be addressed in your cover letter or e-mail. Whether you had personal or professional reasons for not working, the gaps in your employment history need to be explained as you don’t want to leave the employer to make their own assumptions.

–              Be honest! We can’t stress this matter enough. If you are honest with your potential employer, you will not have to worry about them checking your references, doing a background check, or surprising you with questions in an interview.

–              Don’t exclude months of your employment from the job listing. You are better off explaining the gaps in your resume than trying to cover them up. Honesty is really the best policy when it comes to your resume.

–              If you have held jobs that are not applicable to your career objective, list them on your resume anyway. Rather than create gaps in your resume, explain why you held jobs outside of your field in your cover letter or in an email to your potential employer. Again, whether the reasons are personal or professional, explain yourself honestly and don’t leave room for assumptions on the part of your potential employer.

–              Regardless of the reasons for the gaps in your professional history, it is important that the tone in your cover letter and your resume remains positive. Do not sound apologetic – life happens and you don’t need to be sorry for taking time off of work. Be positive, and show your potential employer that you never lost focus on your career.

 

While we all agree that life takes unexpected turns and respect that there will be circumstances that create gaps in our resumes, we can always consider the following actions in order to stay competitive within our field:

–              Apply our time and experience to volunteer positions, community projects, and consulting or freelance work.

–              Take a class at a community college or at the community center that improves your work-related skills and allows you to interact with people with similar professional backgrounds.

–              Read about the new developments in your field. Get a subscription to a professional publication/magazine, or get the newly published books that discuss changes or improvements in your profession.

Most of all, be honest and stay positive. You can’t change your work history, so do your best to show your employer you are a perfect candidate for the job by focusing on your experience and your education, highlighting your achievements and your qualifications.


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Chronological vs. functional resumes

I had a fairly enlightened dad, though if you looked at his resume, it might not seem that way. He was a chartered accountant for Price Waterhouse. He was strict, and we had a very ordered life. To this day, I am the least materialistic person I know, because my father didn’t raise me to just go out and buy this or that car. Hugh Jackman

A resume is a one- to two-page document summarizing your career objectives, professional experiences and achievements, and educational background.

 

While there are numerous ways to format your resume, there are two main resume styles: chronological and functional.

 

As its name implies, a chronological resume is one that lists your experience and education in order, starting with the most recent jobs or achievements. This type of resume is sometimes also referred to as reverse chronological resume, because the order of the listing starts with your current employment. This type of resume preferred – employers will want to know what job you currently hold so that they can better asses your qualifications for the job of your interest. The same is true for your education; your potential employer would rather know your most recent scholastic achievement. Listing your experience and education in reverse chronological order also shows your potential employer your overall career progress. It also helps in determining the length of employment at each organization, and indicates any gaps in your career (in case of gaps, make sure to address them in your cover letter as to not lead your employer to believe that you are omitting information on purpose). Chronological resume should list your current job, as well as two to four previously held positions. Don’t skip any employment information on purpose; if your employment history is long, or if you have held jobs further in the past that align well with your current career objective, you can address these qualifications in your professional profile or in your cover letter. Chronological resumes are the most commonly used style, and work best for anyone who has had some professional experience.

 

Functional resumes focus on your qualifications, not your career timeline. This style of the resume highlights what skills you have, rather than where and when you acquired or utilize them.  In other words, instead of listing your experiences by your job titles, your resume will contained sections titled by your skills such as verbal and written communication, customer satisfaction, project management, etc. This resume style is recommended for college students seeking internships or their first jobs out of college, for those with no professional experience, those who have not worked for some time, or for career changers. While potential employers will appreciate the overview of your skills, if you hold any professional experience, consider using the chronological resume, or a combination resume, over the functional format.

 

A combination resume, although not often discussed, has become a popular format in recent years. As its name implies, it is a combination of chronological resume style and functional resume style. This hybrid style allows professionals to highlight the qualification they have that are critical for the job of their interest, while at the same time listing employment and educational history in reverse chronological order. A word of caution – don’t try to do too much when using a combination resume by going over board with the type and number of sections you include in your resume. It is best to keep the information listed, even in the combination format, to what is relevant for the job.

 

Same rules apply for each style. Don’t exceed two pages, tailor your resume to your career objective and put your best foot forward in order to get the interview, and eventually the job.


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Qualifications – what do employers look for?

I’m the guy to call. Look at the resume. I have kids of my own. I have dogs. Jeff Daniels
When applying for jobs, it is important that you read through the job description thoroughly before submitting your application. A lot of what employers are actually looking for in their potential associate is written right in the job description and requirements. In fact, you should review your resume against the requirements listed in order to make sure you have covered everything the employer is looking for. If you can address all the requirements by the information in your resume or in your cover letter, you will be on the right track for getting the job.

However, there is a whole list of skills employers look for that are never spelled out in the job description. These skills are typically referred to as employability skills, which are skills beyond your technical knowledge and qualifications that make you a great professional in your field. Don’t panic, you already have employability skills, you just may not think of them as critical for getting a job.

The employability skills have been grouped in eight categories:

  • Communication skills
  • Teamwork skills
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Initiative and enterprise skills
  • Planning and organizing skills
  • Self-management
  • Learning skills
  • Technology skills

Now that you have read the categories, you are thinking to yourself, yes, I have those skills. But did you ever think to list them on the resume? Most people focus on their professional achievements and responsibilities, and they often skip these skills in favor of those that are job specific. However, more and more employers look for these skills in resumes. Your potential employer wants to know that you are a team player, that you communicate well, and will show initiative when needed. While you may think this is implied by your interest in the available position, employers like to see these skills called out on your resume or cover letter.

The best way to demonstrate these skills is through your experience and under your qualifications. Point out the initiatives you have participated in that required you to work in a team, under a deadline, or as a self-starter. Demonstrate your loyalty through pointing out your accomplishments at an organization and how they benefited your team as a whole (not just you). You can showcase the employability skills in your cover letter by openly showing your enthusiasm for the available position, stating your commitment to your career objective, indicating your motivation and your integrity, and showing that you are above all un-selfish and credible. These skills are just as critical to your ability to do a great job as your professional experience and education – employers are looking for someone who will be a great fit on their team and in their organization, someone who works well under pressure but also has a sense of humor and has a balance between their personal and professional life.

Review your existing resume. Does it contain any employability skills? If not, make revisions to incorporate those employability skills you feel you excel in. If you are unsure, ask your friends or family for an objective opinion, so that you can get a better idea of how people around you see you as a person as well as a professional. Keep these attributes in mind as you compose your resume and your cover letter, and especially as you are taking part in interviews.  These skills can make a difference between knowing how to do a job and being qualified to exceed goals and grow in your career.


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Resources for resume examples

The internet was supposed to make this whole business of job searching rational and simple. You could post your resume and companies would search them and they’d find you. It doesn’t seem to work that way. There aren’t enough jobs for experienced, college educated managers and professionals. Barbara Ehrenreich
Writing a resume is a difficult task regardless of your level of experience with the process. While the content of your resume is critical to its effectiveness, the layout and the format you utilize are equally as important. To get started, you should research various resume styles and find out which best stouts your field. The biggest mistake people make when composing their resume is using a generic template provided in your text editing software, like Microsoft Word. These templates are usually outdated and very difficult to format, not to mention that they do not transfer well to online job applications. Avoid the quick-fix mentality of these resume templates, and invest some time in finding resources that will provide you with up-to-date helpful ways to compose a winning resume.

 

The easiest and least expensive way to find samples of resumes in your industry is to do a search on the internet. Before you get started, a word of caution: consider the sources of information before you decide to utilize any of their suggestions on your resume. You will come across web sites that promise to teach you how to write an exception cover letter in three and a half minutes. Don’t believe them. Unless you chose to hire a resume writing service, obtaining resources on resume writing should not cost you any money or obligate you to a long-term commitment. If unsure of the credibility on information you see, find another source and compare your findings.

 

A great online resource on resume composition is Monster.com. While they are mostly known for their job search database, they offer a variety of other information and services for those looking for employment. Under the Career Advice tab, you will find a wealth of information on your job search, salary requirements, advice by industry, and of course, information on perfecting your resume. In addition to articles about your job search and resume-related message boards, Monster’s Resume Center includes a variety of resume examples for professionals in a number of different industries. From administrative assistants to web designers, everyone can find a sample of a resume to fit their career objectives at:

 

http://resume.monster.com/archives/samples/

 

This page shows you samples of functional and chronological resumes, traditional resumes and sample cover letters. Take the time to review these samples. They are provided by a reliable source, so don’t be afraid to copy the formatting for your own resume (of course, do not copy the actual text from the resume).

 

If you already have a draft of your resume, and are looking to make updates or revisions, check out the Resume Makeovers for a great look at before and after resume of real professionals:

 

http://resume.monster.com/resume_samples/

 

It is important that you review these samples, even if the industry is not applicable to your line of work. They will teach you the basic dos and don’ts of resume writing – you can see why some things work and why others don’t, and be able to chose the best ways to highlight your qualifications.

 

Same school rules apply – do not copy someone else’s work. However, use these resources to your advantage and create the resume that presents you in the best light.


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Prioritizing job descriptions in your resume

Resume: a written exaggeration of only the good things a person has done in the past, as well as a wish list of the qualities a person would like to have. Bo Bennett

The most difficult and time consuming section of any resume is the listing of your work experience, no matter the level you have reached in your professional career. If you have just graduated college and don’t have any full-time professional experience, you are concerned if your part time job and summer internship are enough to get your foot in the door. If you are a seasoned professional with extensive work experience, you are worried how to fit all of your hard work on only one page. If you are changing careers, you are unsure which skills best showcase your qualifications. Listing work responsibilities on our resumes doesn’t get easier as our career progresses. The key is to consider your career objective and prioritize your work in accordance to your goals.

When people are asked about work responsibilities, they have a tendency to disclose the routine items first. This method can be a costly mistake for listing your professional experiences on your resume because it leaves all of the important and key qualifications at the bottom of the list.  To avoid falling into this practice, first put together a list of your responsibilities on a sheet of paper. For your initial draft, don’t worry about how you are phrasing each statement – just make a list of everything that you do in your current or have done in your previous jobs.

Once your list is completed, consider all of the responsibilities you have included. What are the three most important items on the list for each job? How do those items relate to your career objective? Are there any other responsibilities you have listed that better support your career objective than the three you picked as the most critical to your job? You have to consider all these questions in order to prioritize your job descriptions on your resume.

Begin each description with a power word, such as managed, developed, communicated, etc. Make sure that the statements you list first quantify your achievements – don’t be afraid to list sales figured, customer acquisition rates, budget and timeline successes, or any other figures which help put your responsibilities in a context of the business/field you are working in. Also, these statements should be aligned with your career objective. If you want to get a job in project management, letting your employer know that you managed a team of 20 people will effectively highlight your qualifications. It is important to quantify your job description statements on your resume; however, as a word of caution, do not quantify all statements, just one or two that are most critical to your job and are goal driven. This shows your employer that you think in terms of exceeding your goals. All subsequent descriptions of your responsibilities should support the first one or two items on your list.

Prioritizing doesn’t only apply to your job descriptions, although it is the most commonly disregarded element in this particular area of the resume. Achievements and qualifications are often misrepresented because they are not ordered properly. Same rules apply – consider which of your achievements and your qualifications are most complimentary to your career objective, and list them first. For example, if you are applying for a job in customer service, list your communication skills before your computer skills. While both are important, your communication skills are more in line with your career objective, and therefore should take priority.

 

As a final test, put yourself in the shoes of your employer. Cross-check the job description and make sure that you address the qualifications required for the job with the information on your resume. Let your potential employer know you have what they are looking for, and you’ll be sure to make a great impression.


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3 ways to customize your resume to get the job that you want

It turns out that if you’re a 24-year-old whose only line on their resume says CEO, you are totally unemployable. Sam Yagan

While most resumes appear to look the same on the surface, there are key areas that differentiate well-written winning resumes from those that never make it into the hands of the hiring managers. To customize your resume for the job that you want, pay attention to the following three elements: resume style, career objective, and personal profile.

 

The layout and the style of your resume are as important as the information you are including about your experience and qualifications. The two most commonly used resume styles are chronological and functional. Chronological resume calls for listing your professional expertise in order, much like the name implies, and is used those with some to extensive professional experience. Functional resume showcases your experience by the type of qualifications you have, and is typically used by those lacking professional experience or those changing careers. While there are no set rules on determining the best resume style to use, it is important to keep in mind that the resume format can help or hurt your chances to put your best foot forward. You will want to pick the format that will best highlight your qualifications and your experience. Thus, it is important to understand the difference between the two, as well as research which format is more preferred in the field of your choice.

 

Career objective is very important to your resume. While there is an ongoing debate about the need for listing your objective on your resume, choosing to include this goal statement shows that you have given your professional growth some serious thought. Consider your career objective as the first impression you make on your potential employer. Make sure that your goals are specific and directional in terms of industry, position title, and future professional achievements. Most people make a mistake of including generic statements under their career objective. To be effective, your statement must tell a potential employer that you know what kind of job you want, what experience you have in order to get the position, and what you are willing do to become a successful professional with the company.

 

While your career objective tells your potential employer why you are applying for the job at their organization, your professional profile sells your expertise and convinces the employer that you are the best candidate for the job. Your professional summary/profile gives you the opportunity to differentiate yourself, and give your employer an insight into you. Two commonly made mistakes for this section of the resume are poor writing and inclusion of personal information. Note that your age, ethnicity, gender, religious affiliations, etc. do not make a difference on how you handle yourself as a business professional. Such information should never be included in a resume, or any job application materials (even when asked on a job application, such information is optional and is for demographics study only). Make sure this section is well written and error-free. Strong positive statements about your expertise will give a good first impression to your employer. Make sure to proofread the whole resume, with emphasis to this section, as it appears at the start of your resume. An effective personal statement must leave your employer with an impression that you are confident, credible, and professional.

 

Keep in mind – your resume is your sales pitch, demonstrating your qualifications and experience to your potential employer. Seize the opportunity to put your best foot forward and you will reap the rewards.